Oregon Governor Signs Bill Creating Cannabis Commission

Oregon Governor Signs Bill Creating Cannabis Commission

Oregon Governor Kate Brown signed into law today a bill that establishes the Oregon Cannabis Commission.

marijuana retail outletsThe commission  – which will meet quarterly – is designed to to oversee the state’s medical marijuana program. The bill to create the commission – House Bill 2198 -was approved by the House of Representative with a 48 to 11 vote on July 5th, followed by an 18 to 12 vote in the Senate the following day.

The legislation places the Oregon Cannabis Commission within the Oregon Health Authority, and makes other changes. Once up and running, the commission will consist of the Public Health Officer (or a designee), along with eight members appointed by the governor as follows:

(A) A registry identification cardholder, as defined in ORS 475B.410;

(B) A person designated to produce marijuana by a registry identification cardholder, as defined in ORS 475B.410;
(C) An attending physician, as defined in ORS 475B.410;
(D) A person representing the Oregon Health Authority;
(E) A person representing the Oregon Liquor Control Commission;
(F) A local health officer, as described in ORS 431.418;
(G) A law enforcement officer; and
(H) A person knowledgeable about research proposal grant protocols.
Under the new law, the commission will determine:
(a) A possible framework for the future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program, including:
(A) Proper oversight and regulation of each of the following:
(i) Registry identification cardholders and designated primary caregivers, as those terms are defined in ORS 475B.410;
(ii) Attending physicians, as defined in ORS 475B.410;
(iii) Marijuana grow sites, as defined in ORS 475B.410;
(iv) Marijuana processing sites, as defined in ORS 475B.410; and
(v) Medical marijuana dispensaries, as defined in ORS 475B.410;
(B) Necessary amendments to the laws of the state pertaining to cannabis, including any necessary amendments to ORS 475B.010 to 475B.395 and 475B.400 to 475B.525; and
(C) The future role of the commission with respect to the possible framework.
(b) Steps that the state must take, whether administrative or legislative in nature, to ensure that research on cannabis and cannabis-derived products is being conducted for public purposes, including the advancement of:
(A) Public health policy and public safety policy;
(B) Agronomic and horticultural best practices; and
(C) Medical and pharmacopoeia best practices.
(2) In determining the possible framework for the future governance of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program under subsection (1)(a) of this section, the commission shall consider:
(a) Potential factors that could prevent access to cannabis for medical use;
(b) Potential laws and rules that will facilitate access to cannabis for medical use; and
(c) The impact of federal laws, regulations and policies on the possible framework.
The Oregon Cannabis Commission shall also:
(1) Provide advice to the Oregon Health Authority with respect to the administration ofORS 475B.400 to 475B.525;
(2) Provide advice to the Oregon Liquor Control Commission with respect to the administration of ORS 475B.010 to 475B.395, insofar as those statutes pertain to registry identification cardholders and designated primary caregivers, as those terms are defined in ORS 475B.410;
(3) Develop a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that cannabis will remain a therapeutic option for persons with debilitating medical conditions as defined in ORS 475B.410;
(4) Develop a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that cannabis will remain affordable
for persons with debilitating medical conditions as defined in ORS 475B.410; and
(5) Monitor and study federal laws, regulations and policies regarding marijuana.

The measure also makes some other changes, including making it so that “a marijuana grow site may transfer up to 20 pounds of usable marijuana per year to a person that holds a license issued under ORS 475B.090 or 475B.100”.

For the full text of House Bill 2198, click here.

About Anthony Martinelli

Anthony, co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of TheJointBlog, has worked closely with numerous elected officials who support cannabis law reform, including as the former Campaign Manager for Washington State Representative Dave Upthegrove. He has also been published by multiple media outlets, including the Seattle Times. He can be reached at TheJointBlog@TheJointBlog.com.

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Published at Thu, 03 Aug 2017 05:54:50 +0000